A picture speaks a thousand words (and all that)

We asked our writers to recount a literary experience and provide a pictorial state of mind. One says as much as the other.

Ashlee Poeppmann

My feet relaxing at the beach where I feel most at home.I recently volunteered at the Brisbane Writers Festival last month, and while it was hard work I really enjoyed myself. I was lucky enough to get time to meet and see a few different artists. One of my favourites was Sophie Hannah. It was interesting to hear her story about becoming the ‘new’ Agatha Christie, as Hannah mentioned that it was all just chance that the Christie Estate chose her for the new series. She said you can’t plan luck but you can prepare for it.

My feet relaxing at the beach where I feel most at home.

Carmel Purcell

CarmelLately, most of the literature I have been dealing with has been business-related. I am doing an internship that requires reading many tech-related articles and reports. This has been a positive experience as it has sparked an interest for me in marketing. I intend to learn more about marketing over the next few months and plan to experiment with writing on a variety of different platforms.

This is a picture of me at the markets. I am always in my element when I get to try new kinds of food. I’d love to be a food blogger.  

 

Conan Elphicke

ConanIf I’ve ever had any, they took place years ago, such as when I got tongue-tied in the presence of dissident journalist John Pilger at a book signing, or drove two hours at short notice to see Douglas Adams do a superb book reading at the Harold Park Hotel in Glebe, Sydney.

This conveys my tendency to be a poseur, if nothing else. It was taken in the Noel Coward suite at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore on my honeymoon. I have less hair now and am more dilapidated, physically and psychologically.

 

Elise Janes

Elise beachI’ve taken to streaming author interviews and literary podcasts while I run or do the housework or something else that negates the ability to hold a book in my hand or type. The honesty of some writers is wonderfully liberating but also a constant challenge to my mindset, especially during those long redrafting months when it feels the end will never come. The legendary Maria Popova from Brain Pickings delivered the most recent of these, a rediscovered NYU lecture from Kurt Vonnegut, where he spoke for 50 minutes straight out of his subconscious. He observed that at the age of 47 he’d outlived George Orwell, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, D. H. Lawrence and Jack Kerouac. That gave me pause. As with anything of value it’s the daily getting-up-and-doing that makes it worthwhile, not the so called light at the end of the tunnel. To write everyday, to create, is a privilege. I hope I never forget that.

Jane Abbott

JaneWithout doubt, the most significant experience was when I recently received an offer of publication from Penguin/Random House for their Vintage imprint; a two book deal, with an option on the third. The first book, Watershed, is slated for release next June/July. To have one’s work acknowledged in such a way is the very best possible vindication that you’re on the right track.

 

 

Ken Ward

HMD40-climbing-mountainI’ve never been a big viewer of American TV series. The idea of up to 22 episodes a series with no guarantee of a resolution in the end – not for me. This past year I’ve started to delve into some of the big series over the past 10-15 years, including The Sopranos and Friday Night Lights. There’s so much to love in these programs but it’s what I learnt from the things I hate that’s helped inform my writing of late.
To be specific, Janice Soprano, Tony’s sister. From her first scene, I’ve hated her. Every time she’s on camera, every time she’s talked about while absent my blood pressure boils. I just wish the creators would’ve written her out.
Here’s what I’ve come to understand: Every character has their own agenda, is living their own life and sees events through their own filter. The tension Janice brings to scenes is really important to the drive and push of the story. She’s so blinded by her own sense of entitlement and how unjust life can be, it shapes everything she perceives and does. This impacts the story a lot.
Each time I come to the page and a scene has multiple characters interacting, I’m actively considering this notion from EVERY character’s side: ‘How does this affect my agenda? How is what’s happening here make me feel?’
It’s pushing my scenes and story development in places I didn’t expect I’d go.

 

A Little Gypsy in my Soul: Maria Vantsos

VANTSOSdesign Jodhpur  Rajasthan, India

 

To epitomise the spirit of January’s Embark edition we bring you an interview with Australian travel photographer Maria Vantsos whose flair for bright colour and bold images caught our eye at the Kiribilli Markets in Sydney earlier this month.

 

A Little Gypsy In My Soul is Maria’s collection of fine-art photography featuring far-off lands, exotic streetscapes and bold portraiture that celebrate the raw essence and aesthetic beauty of colour and culture around the world. Her range of display options allows you to choose a single stand-out canvas print or, our favourite, create a wall display of signature block-mounted tiles.

Maria talks to us about her process, her inspiration and the uniqueness of Australian travel culture.

 

We’ll start at the beginning. What brought you into this line of work?

When I was 22, I decided to take a year off from my studies to travel through South America with my older sister. I was studying graphic design at the time majoring in black and white photography. ‪‪Landing in Mexico to kick off our adventure changed that very quickly. Early one morning as we were travelling out of the city and down a dirt road our bus pulled over to pick up some locals and as the fog was lifting and I was awakening to a new day, I looked out of my window seat to see a line of native women in fluorescent pink ponchos and brightly coloured yellow bows tied around their long plaits, zigzagging down a lush green mountainside. I was in awe! I saw art, I saw the boldest of colours playing themselves out within a moment in everyday life. I remember thinking how beautiful it was to ‘see’ the world in colour. After many more trips overseas and friends complimenting me on my photography, I haven’t looked back. I started with several cafe exhibitions where my passion for combining travel, photography, and colour & culture into wall art has grown from there.

 

Your use of colour to evoke the soul of a place is remarkable. Can you describe your artistic process?

Thanks!

‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪’A Little Gypsy In My Soul’ now creates bold, rich fine art photography which celebrates colour and culture around the world! My passion and the challenge is to ‘see’ what can so often be missed‪‪‪‪… weathering paint, a hanging water urn, a passing moment. My body of work is an artistic approach to the celebration of colour but more than that it is also a documentation of tradition, culture, religion, tribe, and an identity unique to that country…. through people and place so much of what is disappearing due to globalisation can be frozen in time due to the power of photography.

‪‪‪‪My photos are featured onto our signature wooden tiles and as fine art canvas prints.

 

VANTSOSdesign Rajasthan, IndiaYou seem to have genuine passion for the places you visit. How do you decide where to travel and what to photograph?

It’s really inspired by how colourful a country is,‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪ where that character of culture and spirit is still predominant in everyday life. Mexico, Morocco, Cuba and India are some of the most fascinating and visually stimulating countries to explore. I also enjoy returning to countries I have previously travelled to years before. As I grow and change over the years my vision of what I’m inspired to capture also matures.

 

In your experience, do you think Australians have a particular interest in travel culture?

Absolutely! Particularly‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪ because we have grown up within a highly multi-cultural society and that exposure to so many different faces and facets influences many to want to explore further. Being so isolated from the rest of the world when we adventurous Aussies travel, we really like to spread our wings‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪!

 

As an artist do you work with anyone else or have you collaborated before?

No, I’m a one woman band, just me and my camera and the wide open road!

 

It seems you have visited some truly exotic places. What’s on the cards for 2015?

Returning to India to photograph the holi festival which marks the end of winter in early March. They welcome in the spring with throwing colour bombs at each other, so I can’t wait to be within the thick of it all to live and capture this amazing experience. ‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪I hope to travel through Vietnam towards the end of the year. I will also be spending the year designing new products featuring my photos so stay tuned.

 

VANTSOSdesign Yellow Rajasthan, IndiaCan you tell us about your current range and maybe highlight some favourite images?

I am currently in the process of working on my new collection for 2015 which I am looking forward to sharing soon.

There will be a feature range of photos from Morocco and the Greek Islands,‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪ showcasing my work from the last trip I did to these countries. It will also feature a new selection of photos from all around the world from previous trips. One of the highlights of my previous catalogue was featuring a beautiful sequence of different coloured turbans and saris I shot through India (pictured).

 

We met at the Kirribilli markets but you display at other retail venues throughout Sydney. Where can people get hold of your work?

I retail at Paddington/Bondi beach markets in Sydney every weekend and around Australia through various homeware and online stores such as Temple & Webster. ‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪‪My work can also be purchased from my website at www.vantsosdesign.com.au

Elise Janes